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On the 26th were in Lat 63°S and Long 94°E. & there were plenty of icebergs to be seen...It came on to blow a regular gale that night, with snow, and a thick fog. The icebergs were so numerous that the Captain thought it would be safer to lie to under the ice of a large one than to drift with the wind, so for 6 hours we did so, until the wind shifted & blew us away from it. The ship was knocked about frightfully during the day by the great rolling seas, & every one was glade when morning appeared. It was considered the worst & most dangerous night we have had, & the Captain never left the deck for hours. Almost all the men's crokery was broken & many messes used Australian meat tins for basins. Altho' we were all eager to see an iceberg, we are just as anxious to lose them now, it is so dangerous sailing these foggy nights with such masses of destruction all round us.

On the 27th it cleared up a little, & we passed numbers more [icebergs], one tabular shaped was 3 miles in length, & was the very largest we have seen. Yesterday it blew very hard & snowed a good deal, & we only ran 60 miles. If you give your finger a slight cut, or knock, in these cold latitudes, it takes weeks to get better.

To-day, Sunday, we ran 150 miles, we are in Lat. 58° S. Long 102°50'E. weather rather warmer; Thermometer standing at 35°; we have passed several icebergs but expect they will be the last. We shall sail all night after this, & shall soon get into the belt of westerly winds, we are only 2000 miles from Melbourne to-day, & expect to be there by the 15th.